Archive | July, 2007

Tracing the Root of Metastasis

As Reviewed By: Maria Johnston

Horse Latitudes by Paul Muldoon. Faber, £14.95, 107 pp.

Paul Muldoon’s tenth poetry collection Horse Latitudes arrived at the close of 2006 together with hisThe End of the Poem: Oxford Lectures on Poetry, a collection of lectures delivered during his time as Professor of Poetry at Oxford.… continue reading...

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The Other Wiman

As Reviewed By: Sunil Iyengar

The Long Home by Christian Wiman. Story Line Press, 1998.

Hard Night by Christian Wiman. Copper Canyon Press, 2005.

When the mantle of Poetry editor descended on the 37-year-old Christian Wiman in 2003, many a poet-critic burned with envy.… continue reading...

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Pretty Pieces: Joan Houlihan on Nathaniel Bellows

Reviewed: Why Speak? by Nathaniel Bellows. W.W. Norton, 2007. 110 pages.

Why speak? A good question. But this debut collection provokes more specific questions: In what way are these poems not short, short, stories?… continue reading...

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I Sense Your Disdain, Darling: Frederick Seidel

As Reviewed By: Ernest Hilbert

Ooga Booga: Poems by Frederick Seidel. FSG, 2006. 112 pp.

Glamour-fueled magazines, like New York, do not characteristically devote much ink to poets.… continue reading...

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The Cantankerous Contrarian

As Reviewed By: Andrew Goodspeed

John Berryman: Selected Poems, edited by Kevin Young. Library of America, 2004.

Kevin Young’s admirable edition of John Berryman’s verse (for the Library of America’s American Poets Project) meets the primary expectations readers may bring to a new edition of Berryman’s selected poetry.… continue reading...

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The Waking Chant of Sunrise: Kevin Ducey

As Reviewed By: Andrew Goodspeed

Rhinoceros by Kevin Ducey. American Poetry Review. $23.00

Kevin Ducey’s great strength is his daring. He frequently appears silly, he risks silliness in his work, and this silliness sometimes succeeds admirably.… continue reading...

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“Yes, I used to drive with my eyes closed”: Ernest Hilbert Interviews Erica Dawson

Interviewer’s note: X.J. Kennedy has written that Erica Dawson “is the most exciting younger poet I’ve seen in years. What drive and verve! Even in lines under tight control, she can sound reckless.… continue reading...

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